Master Of Public Administration | New Orleans, LA (2022)

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MPA Residency

Tulane MPA Residency provides an on-site opportunity for in-person networking, skill development and professional development opportunities while still offering the flexibility and accessibility of online education. During the Tulane MPA residency, students visit New Orleans for experiential learning, collaboration, and networking with peers, program faculty and other individuals working in civic sector careers.

Programming includes lectures, workshops and events that further support the development of skills and competencies offered in the Tulane MPA curriculum. Residencies take place annually and participation is required for completion of the MPA degree. Students may complete the residency at any time in their matriculation.

Courses

MPAD 6000 Public Policy Foundations
This course provides an introduction to policymaking, implementation, and analysis with a focus on practices that reflect the values and priorities of diversity, equity, and inclusivity. Emphasis will be on policy within local and urban contexts, including that of New Orleans. Topics will include the impact of public, nonprofit, and private sectors on policy decisions; advocacy; contemporary critical issues; foundations of policy analysis; and the politics of the policy process. Students will be introduced to the fundamental theoretical frameworks used to describe public policy development processes, as well as to contemporary critiques of those frameworks.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of public policy within public sector practice and develop plans and strategies for effective leadership within dynamic public policy contexts and environments.

MPAD 6100 Technology and Civic Sector Leadership
This course examines the relationship between society, technology, and public administration professions, and how leaders effectively utilize contemporary and evolving technologies. Emphasis will be on local and urban contexts, with students analyzing specific cases from New Orleans. It will explore the challenges and opportunities presented by technological emergence and advancements along with the impact of technology on public administration considerations and practice. Topics will include: public infrastructure; use and analysis of data collection; privacy issues; artificial intelligence and other innovations; implications of contemporary technologies for policy and regulation; technology ethics; data breaches and crisis management; and other emergent contemporary issues and contexts.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of technology within civic sector leadership; and develop plans and strategies for effective management of technology innovations within dynamic public, nonprofit, and private sector environments.

MPAD 6110 Data-Informed Leadership, Management, and Decision-Making
This course examines the use of data in strengthening the effectiveness in public service organization leadership, management, programming, and decision-making. Emphasis will be on local and urban contexts, with students analyzing specific cases from New Orleans. It will explore tools and approaches to collecting, analyzing, and communicating data. Topics will include data collection, use and analysis, policy implications, contemporary issues, innovations, contexts, ethics, and leadership/management skills and capabilities. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by data-informed leadership and decision-making.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of data within public sector leadership, practice, and decision-making; and develop plans and strategies for effective management of data within dynamic public sector contexts and environments.

MPAD 6120 Public Organizational Leadership, Cross-Sector Partnerships, and Stakeholder Engagement
This course will examine both theories and practice approaches of public service organizational leadership, management frameworks for cross-sector partnerships, and stakeholder engagement at global, national, state and local levels. Emphasis will be on local and urban contexts, with students analyzing specific cases from New Orleans. It will explore organizational management; leadership, culture, and structure in complex internal and external contexts, cultivation of internal and external stakeholders, best practices and pitfalls in translating from one sector to another, systems thinking, public interest communication, new models of cross-sector collaboration, and approaches to foster community and partner buy-in and cooperation; the strategic planning for and management of competing and cooperative interests, approaches to identify common and conflicting goals, objectives and priorities; and strategies for clarifying, communicating, and managing goals and expectations. Topics will include foundations of leadership and management, organizational environmental awareness, organizational behavior, performance management, decision-making, individual and group management, and collaborative partnerships development and growth. Attention will be given to the interdisciplinary and cross-sector development and implementation of public service initiatives and programming.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of organizational leadership and stakeholder engagement within public sector leadership, practice and decision-making; and develop plans and strategies for effective management of internal and external relationships and environments within dynamic public sector contexts.

MPAD 6130 Budgeting and Financial Management
This course will examine theoretical and practical approaches in budgeting and financial management within public service organizations. It will explore strategies for ensuring alignment of resource development and management with organizational goals, objectives, and priorities; fund development strategies; evaluation of budget and financial management systems effectiveness; strategies for addressing financial management and budgeting challenges; as well as the alignment of budget analysis with organizational decision-making.

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At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of budgeting and financial management within public sector leadership, practice, and decision-making; and develop plans and strategies for effective management of financial resources within dynamic public sector contexts and environments.

MPAD 6140 Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Public Service
This course examines topics central to operationalizing equity frameworks and priorities within civic sector leadership and practice. It will explore strategies for the development of competencies for fostering equitable approaches to work within public service. Emphasis will be on local and urban contexts, with students analyzing specific cases from New Orleans. Topics explored will include historical/social contexts related to issues of equity and impact on public sector work; cost-benefits of equity in the civic sector; equity competency rooted approaches to public service; collective and cultural narratives; intersections of equity, diversity, inclusion, and public service systems and structures. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by civic sector leadership and practice.

At the completion of the course, students will be able to define equity in public sector leadership; describe and critically analyze the role of equity within public sector practice; and develop plans and strategies for effective operationalization of approaches to the cultivation of equity within professions related to the public sector.

MPAD 7900 MPA Capstone
In this course, students apply concepts, theories, best practices, knowledge, and principles as learned throughout the program. Additionally, students will grapple with the complexities of public sector work by testing concepts, strategies, and approaches in real-world contexts. Through a site-based immersion project completed through options such as fieldwork, internships, civic practice labs, or simulations, students will demonstrate mastery of program objectives and course competencies. Mastery will be shown through the creation of a final written report that provides findings and focusing on civic practice implications. Report findings will be presented; presentations may incorporate design approaches and elements appropriate to audiences found in real-world public sector practice environments.

MPA program students with less than three years of relevant work experience will participate in a capstone with an experiential site-based component where a project is shaped on-site and applied. Elements include issue/problem identification and related factors, strategic recommendations, key considerations, implementation approaches, analysis and evaluation, applied research methodologies, research design, data collection, and analysis and presentation.

MPAD 7100 Educational Leadership and Policy for Changemakers
This course provides an overview of leadership and policy topics especially relevant to leadership in the education sector through four modules. For the policy module, topics include federal, state, and local education policy development; the influence of law and policy on schooling over time; and the role of education leaders in policy advocacy and enactment. The course includes a module on the politics and contextual factors involved in leading in collaboration with a school board. A third module on school law provides an overview of the most significant legal issues in public elementary and secondary schools and implications for leading and decision-making. The final module centers on the effective and sustainable education leader with an emphasis on growing the ability to understand, engage, and effectively support and challenge others and creating conditions for equitable school and system transformation and governance. The course will use case studies and live cases with current education leaders to engage students authentically in the field.

At the completion of the course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the roles and leadership implications of policy and law on public education, develop plans and strategies for effective board leadership and collaboration, and define sustainable and effective leadership for themselves as education leaders.

MPAD 7110 An Introduction to Education Finance and Budgeting: Implications for Strategy, Equity, and Change
This course is an introduction to public school finance and budgeting systems in the United States. Budgeting and finance impact all aspects of schooling and education and are therefore critical to education leadership at all levels. Focus areas include the budgeting process; the politics of budgeting; district and school cost drivers; revenue generation including federal, state, and local funding sources; norm-based budgeting; weighted-student funding; cost-benefit analysis; benchmarking; and “key performance indicators” (KPIs) and “objectives and key results” (OKRs). Questions include: How can budgeting reflect the values and priorities of schools and systems? What are the equity implications of education budgeting and finance? What are the economic and financial drivers that maintain or disrupt the status quo? The course will use case studies and simulations from both traditional public and charter settings with special emphasis on the New Orleans context.

At the completion of the course, students will be able to critically analyze school and system budgets, as well as consider the financial implications of policies and proposals on schools and systems.

MPAD 7120 Reimagining and Leading Education Systems for the Future
This course supports education leaders in developing and communicating a vision and strategy for student success centered on excellence and equity for all. The early part of the course includes a historical overview of schooling in the U.S. and the influence of this history on the features and limitations of the current system, including the educational implications of race and poverty. The course also includes an investigation of shifts in learning, management, and equity, as well as a survey of promising systemic reforms and strategies such as integrated student supports, collective impact, and cross-sector collaboration. Key skills of effective education leaders include communicating and building support for vision and change. Students will also develop a public narrative and strategic communication plan around their vision and strategy. Questions include: What are the vision, qualities, and characteristics of future-focused, future-ready learning organizations? How can a leader move from vision to transformational change for students? The course will include a variety of texts, including interviews with leaders in the field, as well as specific instruction in design thinking and strategic communication.

At the completion of the course, students will develop a prototype vision and strategy for leading a future-focused and future-ready learning organization.

MPAD 7130 Leading Learning
The course examines leading learning as a system-level task. Focus areas include the instructional core and the centrality of the instructional task as predictive of student learning; current models of learning; challenges of improving instruction, effective management of learning systems; developing, enacting, and scaling vision for learning; and the role of evidence in decisions about practice and policy impacting learning. In addition, the course addresses the roles of the leader’s identity and previous learning experiences, as well as their implications for equity and leadership. Throughout the course, students will examine current systems of learning through classroom observations, interviews with leaders in the field and case studies. What does great learning look like, and how do we create equitable systems that support and demand high-quality learning experiences and outcomes for all?

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At the completion of the course, students will have gained an understanding of what it means to lead learning as a system or building-level leader and develop their own conception of effective learning and strategies for enacting it across a school, system, or program.

MPAD 7200 Nonprofits, Philanthropy, and the Civic Sector
This course examines the role of nonprofits and philanthropy in advancing practice and innovation within the civic sector. The course explores multi-sector exchanges and intersections, focusing on the impact and capacity of nonprofits and philanthropic organizations to advance civic sector. Topics include historical contexts of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy; connections to social change and public policy; values, ethics, and equity; and contemporary and future-focused issues, venture philanthropy, mission-related and program-related investments, and other innovations.

At the completion of the course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of nonprofit and philanthropic organizations within public sector practice, understand the implications of engagement of nonprofit and philanthropic organizations in multi-sector approaches to public sector practice, and develop plans and strategies for effective leveraging of nonprofit and philanthropic organizations in supporting sustainable civic sector impact.

MPAD 7210 Evaluation and Outcomes Management
This course supports the development, implementation, and management of nonprofit and philanthropic organizational programs by examining theories and approaches related to evaluation and outcomes management. The course explores considerations and implications of evaluation not only from a programmatic perspective, but also the impact of dimensions of organizational performance on overall effectiveness. Focus areas include program delivery, tools, and approaches to monitoring and evaluating organizational activities and programs, systems thinking evaluation, facilitating strategic learning, developmental evaluation, determinates of effectiveness, outcome evaluations, program analysis, process evaluation, equitable evaluation, and organizational and program adaptability. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by nonprofit and philanthropic decisions and initiatives.

At the completion of the course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of evaluation and outcomes management at both programmatic and organizational levels; understand the implications of evaluation for programmatic and organizational leadership and decision making; and develop plans and strategies for effective program development, implementation, management, and adaptation within nonprofit and philanthropic organizations.

MPAD 7220 Organizational Sustainability, Leadership, and Governance
This course examines both theories and practice approaches to nonprofit and philanthropic organization leadership and governance with a focus on the cultivation of organizational sustainability within dynamic civic sector contexts. Emphasis will be on local and urban contexts, with students analyzing specific cases from New Orleans. The course will explore foundational nonprofit and philanthropic organization governance designs and functions along with strategies for the development and management of organizational leadership and governance that is equipped to successfully support adaptability, effectiveness, and long-term sustainability. Topics will include foundations of leadership and governance approaches; board functions, development, and management; stakeholder relationship management, leadership, and governance values and ethics; leadership planning and succession; and organizational culture, change, adaptability, and sustainability.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of organizational leadership and stakeholder engagement within public sector leadership, practice, and decision-making and develop plans and strategies for effective management of internal and external relationships and environments within diverse public sector contexts.

MPAD 7230 Financial Management, Resource Development, and Capacity Building
This course examines theoretical and practical approaches in the financial management of nonprofit and philanthropic organizations focusing on supporting the strengthening of organizational capacity and fiscal sustainability. It will explore strategies for resource development and evaluation of budget and financial management effectiveness. Topics will include financial management and budgeting issues, resource cultivation and management, grant seeking and contract management, capacity building and sustainability issues, and fund development strategies.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze approaches to financial management and resource development within nonprofit and philanthropic organization leadership and decision-making and develop plans and strategies for effective acquisition and management of resources.

MPAD 7240 Foundations of Strategic Philanthropy
This course examines the role of strategic philanthropic investment as a catalyst for change and innovation within the civic sector. The course explores cross-sector intersections and collaborations, focusing on the impact and capacity of strategic philanthropy and frameworks of program-related, mission-related investing. Focus areas include models of civic sector-focused strategic philanthropy, systems thinking and philanthropy, philanthropic program design for sustainable outcomes, and cross-sector philanthropic program engagement. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by philanthropic decisions and initiatives.

At the completion of the course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of strategic philanthropy as a lever of societal change, understand the implications of corporate responsibilities and impact investing in multi-sector approaches to public sector practice, and develop strategies for effective leveraging of philanthropic organizations in supporting sustainable civic sector impact.

MPAD 7300 Elements of Economic Development
This course will provide an introduction to economic development focusing on impact and intersections within the civic sector. The course will explore theory and practice strategies of economic development along with the implications for society and public sector professionals. Emphasis will be on local and urban contexts, with students analyzing specific cases from New Orleans. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by economic development policy and initiatives. Focus areas include strategies for the development of healthy local and regional economies, cross-sector collaborations, equity and ethics, tax incentives and regulations, workforce development, civic sector engagement in business attraction, entrepreneurship and small business development, public policy considerations and intersections, and contemporary issues in economic development.

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At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of economic development within the civic sector; understand the implications of economic development within local, regional, and national public sector contexts; and develop strategies for effective multi-sector engagement in economic development practice.

MPAD 7310 Economic Development Challenges and Civic Resilience
This course examines the intersections of civic resilience and economic development. The course will explore theory, systems, practices, and innovations related to civic resilience and business development. Emphasis will be on related local, regional, and national contemporary issues affecting civic sector practice. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by economic development policy and initiatives. Focus areas include dimensions of business development and related civic resilience dimensions: economy and society, infrastructure and environment, leadership and strategy, equity and ethics; and cross-sector engagement in the management of economic development challenges and resilience.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of civic resilience within economic development contexts; understand the implications of civic resilience for economic development within local, regional, and national public sector contexts; and develop strategies for effective multi-sector engagement in civic economic resilience practice.

MPAD 7320 Economic Development and Urban Transformation
This course examines economic development as a driver of sustainable civic advancement and positive urban growth. It will explore contemporary strategies with the aim of conceptualizing actionable cross-sector frameworks for transformational economic development. Emphasis will be on local contexts and the experience of New Orleans and other civic notables in urban innovation. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by economic development policy and initiatives. Focus areas include a comparative analysis of urban transformation, drivers of sustainable business development transformation in urban cities, public sector collaborations, issues of equity and ethics, intersections of data and technology, and contemporary issues.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze economic development strategies for supporting urban transformation; conceptualize actionable strategies for transformational economic development; and understand the implications of economic development transformation within local, regional, and national public sector contexts.

MPAD 7330 Social Equity and Economic Development
This course examines topics central to operationalizing social equity frameworks and priorities within economic development leadership and practice. It will explore strategies for the development of competencies for fostering equitable approaches to work within economic development. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by economic development policy and initiatives. Emphasis will be on local and urban contexts, with students analyzing specific cases from New Orleans. Topics explored will include historical/social contexts related to issues of equity and impact on economic development, equity competency rooted approaches to economic development, systemic barriers to minority-owned small business development and financing, and intersections of equity/diversity and cross-sector cooperation.

At the completion of the course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of social equity within economic development practice and develop plans and strategies for effective operationalization of approaches to the cultivation of equity within economic development work.

MPAD 7400 Environmental Policy
This course provides an introduction to contemporary issues related to the natural environment and related policymaking and civic practice. Emphasis will be on environmental policy within local and urban contexts, with students analyzing specific cases from New Orleans. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by environmental challenges. Topics will include cross-sector engagement and interactions surrounding and environmental policy decisions, environmental risk solutions, funding, and advocacy.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of environmental policy within society and public sector practice and develop plans and strategies for effective leadership within dynamic policy contexts.

MPAD 7410 Environmental Challenges and Civic Resilience
This course examines the intersections of civic resilience and concerns surrounding the natural environment. The course will explore theories, practices, and innovations related to civic resilience and contemporary issues connected to environmental risks and challenges. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by environmental challenges. Emphasis will be on related local, regional, and national contemporary issues affecting civic sector practice. Focus areas include dimensions of environmental management and related civic resilience dimensions: health and well-being, economy and society, infrastructure and environment, and leadership and strategy. The course will also examine questions of environmental sustainability, equity and ethics, risk mitigation, and cross-sector engagement in the management of environmental challenges and resilience.

At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of civic resilience within environmental management practice, understand the implications of civic resilience for environmental management, and develop strategies for effective multi-sector engagement.

MPAD 7420 The Role of Data in Environmental Decisions
This course examines the use of data in strengthening the effectiveness of decision-making related to civic sector concerns surrounding the natural environment. Emphasis will be on local and urban contexts, with students analyzing specific cases from New Orleans. The course will examine approaches to incorporating participation and perspectives of communities and individuals directly affected by environmental challenges. It will explore tools and approaches to collecting, analyzing, and communicating data. Topics will include intersections of data, equity, and decisions; management of data certainties and uncertainties in environmental decision-making; and incorporation of data into decision-making processes.

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At the completion of this course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of data within environmental management decision-making and develop plans and strategies for effective management of data within dynamic environmental management contexts.

MPAD 7430 Social Equity and Environmental Management
This course examines topics central to operationalizing social equity frameworks and priorities within environmental management practice. It will explore strategies for the development of competencies for fostering equitable approaches to civic work related to the management of environmental risks and challenges and prioritizing the inclusion of stakeholders, communities, and individuals impacted by environmental challenges. Emphasis will be on local and urban contexts, with students analyzing specific cases from New Orleans. Topics explored will include historical/social contexts related to issues of equity and impact on environmental management, equity competency rooted approaches to environmental management, intersections of equity/diversity, and cross-sector cooperation.

At the completion of the course, students will be able to describe and critically analyze the role of social equity within environmental management practice and develop plans and strategies for effective operationalization of approaches to the cultivation of equity within environmental management work.

EMMT 6001 Introduction to Emergency Management
This course will be an advanced examination of modern emergency management concepts, trends nationally and internationally, practical and political issues and policies, technological applications to emergency management, and the development and practical implementation of sound emergency management practices designed to protect people, communities, critical infrastructure and key assets. Included will be a brief review of emergency management policy and procedures in the United Sates and other countries, legal issues, social science perspectives, planning concepts and techniques, disaster modeling, operational problems, analytical methods, special populations, and management styles. Additionally, case studies will be examined to determine the extent of effective or ineffective planning, responding, and recovering from natural and technological disasters.

EMMT 6002 Health and Medical Issues in Emergency Management
An advanced study of the important health and medical management issues involved in crises and emergencies presented for the non-medical emergency manager. The wide range of medical and health issues inherent to a crisis including biological, radiological, nuclear events and emergencies are described. Students will focus on innovative response and recovery including long term public health recovery issues methods for integrating medical, public health, and psychological processes into emergency management.

EMMT 6003 Homeland Security and Approaches to Counter-Terrorism
Students will employ critical analysis to examine key policy issues and balances that must be addressed in strategic counterterrorism planning, particularly in the use of applied technology within the context of civil jurisdiction and rule of law. The course will examine terrorist threats to the homeland and how these threats can be met by the application of science and technology. Policy issues that address the balance between security and civil liberties that must be resolved to effectively counter terrorism will be discussed. These issues will be addressed from the governance perspective of a liberal democracy. Strategic planning principles that integrate capabilities of current and future applied technology and the key legal and policy issues that must be resolved in order to make effective use of information as balanced against civil liberties will be explored as well.

EMMT 6004 Business Continuity
With global business stretched across extended supply chains, productivity has increased but it has come at a cost of increased vulnerability. Businesses cannot afford to be unprepared for traditional and emerging threats. Business Continuity is a fast-growing area of emergency management focused on the private sector. This specialty works to ensure continuous business operations before, during, and after disasters or other normal disruptions. It is designed to provide strategies tied to national and international standards for the development of detailed business continuity plans. Student will discuss managing disruptions, maintaining continuity of critical operations, and mitigating losses that occur when interrupted. Based on the all-hazard framework, students will learn about the current threats, including political instability and cyber attacks. Regardless of the impetus for such disruptive events, students will be prepared to train employees to be prepared to both mitigate and recover from such events. Students will also discuss best practices in the ongoing recovery efforts after an event.

EMMT 6005 Risk Management and Threat Assessment
This course examines the concepts, methods, and practices associated with risk management and threat assessment from an all-hazard perspective. Students will learn how to conduct hazard and risk analysis for both the public and private sectors. This course will include identifying and profiling hazards, analyzing and assessing hazard risk, developing tactics to manage risk, examining a multiple of risk assessment tools, and communicating risk to the public. Participants will examine critical infrastructure sectors and associated interdependencies, cascading consequences, and shared vulnerabilities. Students will perform their own risk analysis and develop recommendations for policy makers as part of this curriculum.

EMMT 6006 Emergency Planning
Through a whole-community approach, this course provides an in-depth analysis of the processes and methods used throughout the entire federally-designated preparedness cycle. Planning is the backbone of the emergency management process. Steps required to develop a comprehensive emergency plan from the strategic, tactical, and operational approach will be discussed. Students will learn the skills to complete plans, develop training programs, and write after action reports and improvement plans. This course prepares students to develop plans that address vulnerabilities and promote community resiliency. Students will complete a draft plan for a local community organization as part of this curriculum.

EMMT 6007 Disaster Communications
This course discusses historical and emerging issues that accompany communication and messaging during disaster and emergency situations. Students will analyze best practices, tools, and tactics for crisis and risk communication. Participants will have the opportunity to develop strategies and communication solutions for all audiences, including internal and external partners, the public, and social media.

EMMT 6008 Cyber Threats and Homeland Security
“Cyberspace” has become a pervasive presence in modern society, and a healthy functioning cyberspace is elemental to our economy and to national security. Along with benefits, however, there exists threats and malicious actors who seek to exploit cyberspace vulnerabilities, and, in doing so, threaten critical infrastructure and threaten National Security. This course will study the nature of cyber threats, including computer and digital crimes, information warfare and cyber terrorism, and related threats to personal, organizational, economic and national security. Students will gain an understanding of the variety and nature of cyber threats including digital espionage, computer break-ins, computer hacking, malware, communications eavesdropping, forgery, disruption to information flow, electronic bombs, cyber war and the growing presence of terrorist organizations on the internet. This course will also review countermeasures and a protection methodology to cyber threats, cyber security investigations, evidence gathering, and legal challenges. Lastly, this course will review current and national policies for securing cyberspace and the impact of cyber security on privacy and civil liberties.

EMMT 6009 Emergency Management Administration
Modern emergency managers are required to perform an ever-increasing number of administrative tasks. Their workload exceeds activities associated with operational emergency management. This course provides students the skills required for those tasks, including grant management and principles of managing an effective staff. Students will develop the capabilities necessary to successfully complete these administrative requirements.

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EMMT 7001 Sport/Event Security and Response
Concerts, athletic contests, and other large scale public events are under an increased man-made threat. Officials and first responders face the task of protecting the public while allowing for these types of events to continues. This class will examine the full range of issues that must be considered as plans for safety and security are developed. In addition, students will learn specialized planning and tactics required for coordinating a response to an emergency in this environment.

EMMT 7002 Leadership, Influence, and Decision Making in Emergency Management
Emergency management practitioners must use leadership and influence effectively to lead organizations and their community in planning for, preventing, and responding to emergencies. This type of leadership encompasses vision, direction, coordination, and motivation toward achieving emergency management goals. Leadership skills are necessary whether dealing with senior agency officials, emergency management partners, or the public. A lack of leadership during an emergency can result in the loss of life, property, and the public trust. This course will expose students to the major factors, theories, and strategies for leadership, influence, and decision making. The traits, skills, and behaviors of effective leaders will also be discussed.

EMMT 7900 Emergency Management Capstone
This course synthesizes the full range of knowledge, skills, and abilities students developed over the entirety of their emergency management studies. Students will integrate and apply key concepts through a community-based project, developing a proposal and conducting this project at a public or non-profit sector entity. At the end of the semester, the project will be presented both to the chosen organization and classmates. Students will integrate critical decision-making skills with a unique and local hands-on learning experience. A written report documenting all aspects of the project will be presented for faculty approval.

FAQs

Is a masters in public administration worth it? ›

If you want to become a leader or manager, or move up to middle, upper and even the highest levels of management and leadership in a government sector or nonprofit arena, then an MPA can be a very valuable degree and critical part of your management and leadership training.

What can I do with MA in public administration? ›

Here are some of the most popular and hunted jobs in Public Administration:
  • Tax Examiner. ...
  • Budget Analyst. ...
  • Public Administration Consultant. ...
  • City Manager. ...
  • Mayor. ...
  • International Aid/Development Worker. ...
  • Fundraising Manager.
13 Jan 2022

How many years is a MPA degree? ›

Many MPA programs offer many concentrations, such as nonprofit management and public policy. Most MPA programs take two years to complete, and a few may be completed in as little as a single year. Note that a related degree is the Master of Public Policy (MPP).

Is an MPA a terminal degree? ›

An Master's in Public Administration (MPA) is a terminal degree in the field. This means that it's the highest level degree one can earn in public administration.

Is an MBA or MPA better? ›

The MBA mostly focuses on developing your business administration and management skills. An MPA will focus more on public sector and nonprofit management and administration. Generally, the MBA is going to be more for you if you are interested in modern business and the private sector.

Can I put MPA after my name? ›

In social situations, you should not add your degree to your name. Unless you work in academia, only add the degree if it is directly related or required for your job or for the service you provide. For example, if the degree is required, such as a M.P.A. or M.S.W., include it.

What is the best job for public administration? ›

Top Public Administration Career Areas
  • Chief Executive. ...
  • Medical and Health Services Manager. ...
  • Human Resource Manager. ...
  • Top Executive. ...
  • Administrative Services Manager. ...
  • Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration. ...
  • Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. ...
  • American Society for Public Administration.

Is public administration hard? ›

The subject is generally regarded as easy and simple to understand. There is ample study material for public administration. The questions are generally straightforward. There is a lot of overlap with the general studies papers.

Can a public administrator work in a hospital? ›

In addition to oversight from federal agencies, doctors and hospitals must conform to numerous federal and state laws. Public administrators play a crucial role in the oversight of doctors on two levels.

What is an MPA good for? ›

A master of public administration (MPA) is a master's degree in public affairs that prepares recipients to serve in executive positions in municipal, state, and federal government and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs).

What does a masters in Public Administration teach you? ›

In an MPA program, you will study courses such as organizational theory, government and policy, budgeting, human resources management, strategic planning, and statistics. Many programs allow you to specialize in fields like economics, environment, public health, emergency management, and international affairs.

What is MPA qualification? ›

Government agencies and non-profit organizations often have different business goals and needs than companies in the private sector. With a Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree, you can gain an important education to prepare you for a leadership role in the public or non-profit sectors.

Are MPA degrees in demand? ›

The career outlook for MPA grads is very good, but it can also vary with each position. Work in the area of public administration is very much in demand today.

What does MPA mean after someone's name? ›

MPA means Master of Public Administration. This is a graduate university degree offered by many schools throughout the United States. The MPA is a "professional" degree, which means that it is principally for people who intend it as their highest level diploma and will apply their learning in the work place.

What is the difference between Public Administration and public policy? ›

Public policy refers to the process of making organizational decisions and political, management, financial, and administrative policies to meet established goals. Public administration is the study and use of govern- ment policy including both government and non-governmental management.

Can I work in government with an MBA? ›

Major Federal Agencies

According to the Department of the Treasury website, possible careers for MBAs include accountants, financial analysts, economists, and marketing specialists. Jobs within the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) are also available to those with MBA degrees.

Is MPA similar to MBA? ›

MBA students typically come from a background working in the private sector, while MPAs are more focused on the public sector. MPA students are more likely to have an undergraduate background in social sciences, while it's more common for MBAs to have undergrad degrees business, economics, or engineering.

Is MBA equivalent to MPA? ›

Some might assume the MPA (Master of Public Administration) is merely a variant or even another name for the MBA. The truth is, while the degrees are somewhat similar, there are significant differences. The degrees are not interchangeable, and it's essential to choose the right one.

How do you address someone with a Master's degree? ›

In the United States there's no formal pre-nominal title held by individuals holding a Master's degree that I know of, so it's very unlike Dr. Xxxx that one holding a Ph. D., etc. might be addressed. In text, you would address such a person with a post-nominal suffix like M.A., MBA, etc.

Does a masters give you a title? ›

A Master's is the most popular postgraduate qualification. Master's degrees come with titles such as Master of Arts – MA, Master of Science – MSc, Master of Engineering – MEng, Master of Research – MRes and Master of Laws – LLM.

What letters go after your name with a Master's degree? ›

Guidance on Post-Nominal Letters
Award LevelAward TypeAbbreviation
Master's DegreesMaster of ArtsMA
Master of Business AdministrationMBA
Master of DesignMDes
Master of PhilosophyMPhil
28 more rows

How much is the salary of public administration? ›

Public Administration Salary in Nigeria

Private employees pay more than government but not in all cases. The salary range for Public Administration graduates in Nigeria is between 30,000 naira to 1 million naira per month.

Why do people study public administration? ›

While studying Public Administration you will develop the leadership and management skills. You will be taught how to manage people efficiently and how to inspire them for the productive work. You will learn how to be a leader and how to transfer tasks to other workers.

What is the duty of a public administrator? ›

Public administrator Job Description involves people working for the public sector, responsible for executing state, federal and local affairs of government. Public administrator job description oversees local agencies as well and none governmental organization.

Which is better sociology or public administration? ›

They also offer pub ad test series which is best pub ad test series because of the efforts put in, in making each question. Thus after discussing public administration vs sociology optional, we can say that public administration is the best optional subject for UPSC. And it may give a boost to your score card UPSC.

Is public administration better than political science? ›

Both the subjects have a large number of takers although public administration trumps the other if you go by the absolute number of candidates taking public administration. These subjects can be taken by candidates from different educational backgrounds because they are social sciences and easy enough to understand.

Is public administration a good career? ›

There are many benefits working for local government, including better job security than in the private sector, access to a good pension, medical aid and a housing scheme as well as a guaranteed 13th cheque.

What knowledge does public administration require? ›

Holistic understanding of the political, social, technological, and economic factors that influence the development and implementation of public policies. Firm knowledge of the range of methodologies appropriate to policy analysis and program evaluation.

Are MPA programs hard? ›

Defining the MPA is quite difficult and very few people truly understand it. One of the reasons for this is that not many people hold the degree because people often choose the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. Secondly, the degree is so broad that it can be difficult to really give it a definition.

Who can do masters in Public Administration? ›

MA Public Administration Eligibility

The candidates must have completed a graduation degree in any discipline from a recognized university with at least 50 percent aggregate marks. The age limit and other criteria for admission varies from college to college.

Which is better MPA or MPP? ›

The MPP degree is a rigorous, focused, skills-oriented program geared toward students who want to pursue a career in policy analysis; in contrast, the MPA degree is broader in focus, building on students' prior professional experience and preparing them to lead and manage public service organizations.

Is public administration a profession or just an occupation? ›

Different traditions tend to draw up different lists of paradigm professions. For the political tradition, however, public administration is plainly a profession in any country with a formal civil service.

How do you write an MPA on a resume? ›

Write a master's degree on a resume in the education section. Pro Tip: List your degrees on a resume in reverse-chronological order. In other words, put your most recent degree at the top, and follow it with the previously earned one(s).

How old is public administration? ›

The field of Public administration dates back to the 1887 with the publication of Woodrow Wilson's founding essay “The Study of Administration”. Public Administration is more than 125 years old.

Can I get a corporate job with an MPA? ›

There are thousands of different career paths you can choose from once you have completed your MPA degree program. Both local, state and federal governments and private businesses and companies hire those with an MPA degree making the possibilities endless.

How much is the salary of public administration in the Philippines? ›

The gross salary range for people working in Philippines in Public Administration, Self-governance is typically from 12,329.00 PHP (minimum salary) to 24,015.00 PHP (highest average, actual maximum salary is higher). This is the total monthly salary including bonuses.

What is Public Administration course? ›

Program Overview. The Bachelor of Science in Public Administration (BSPA) is a four-year degree program designed to provide students with theoretical knowledge and practical skills in public sector management, policy development, and labor relations.

Is it masters or master's degree? ›

The correct way to spell master's degree is with the apostrophe. The s in master's indicates a possessive (the degree of a master), not a plural. If you're speaking of a specific degree, you should capitalize master and avoid creating a possessive: Master of Science. The same rules apply to a bachelor's degree.

What does MPA mean on a report card? ›

A Master of Public Administration, or MPA, is a versatile graduate degree that opens doors to many exciting career possibilities in the public sector.

Is a masters of public policy worth it? ›

Yes, a master's in public policy is worth it for many students. The Bureau of Labor Statistics is projecting 5% job growth in life, physical, and social science occupations over the next 10 years. Common public policy careers in this field include political scientist, urban or regional planner, and survey researcher.

What are the 3 types of public policy? ›

Public policy can be studied as producing three types of policies (distributive, regulatory and re-distributive) related with decision making process.

How can I study public administration? ›

Strategy for Public Administration Optional
  1. Be thorough with the basic books and concepts.
  2. Makes short notes.
  3. Study optional regularly.
  4. Remember quotes from thinkers.
  5. Answer writing practise and Test series.
  6. Previous year questions.
  7. An approach like a Pub Ad Student.
  8. Also Read:

What is the benefit of a masters in public administration? ›

An MPA can position graduates for a variety of career paths, including city or county managers, program administrators or managers, human resources directors, nonprofit executives, government affairs directors, or public policy directors. Many public service careers offer stability and excellent benefits.

Is a masters in public administration hard? ›

Defining the MPA is quite difficult and very few people truly understand it. One of the reasons for this is that not many people hold the degree because people often choose the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. Secondly, the degree is so broad that it can be difficult to really give it a definition.

What is an MPA good for? ›

A master of public administration (MPA) is a master's degree in public affairs that prepares recipients to serve in executive positions in municipal, state, and federal government and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs).

Which is better MPA or MPP? ›

The MPP degree is a rigorous, focused, skills-oriented program geared toward students who want to pursue a career in policy analysis; in contrast, the MPA degree is broader in focus, building on students' prior professional experience and preparing them to lead and manage public service organizations.

Is public administration hard? ›

The subject is generally regarded as easy and simple to understand. There is ample study material for public administration. The questions are generally straightforward. There is a lot of overlap with the general studies papers.

Who can do masters in public administration? ›

MA Public Administration Eligibility

The candidates must have completed a graduation degree in any discipline from a recognized university with at least 50 percent aggregate marks. The age limit and other criteria for admission varies from college to college.

Is public administration a good career? ›

There are many benefits working for local government, including better job security than in the private sector, access to a good pension, medical aid and a housing scheme as well as a guaranteed 13th cheque.

Are MPA degrees in demand? ›

The career outlook for MPA grads is very good, but it can also vary with each position. Work in the area of public administration is very much in demand today.

Does MPA require work experience? ›

“You learn a lot of these things in the field,” adds Clark, “but an MPA program offers a safe space to try things out and explore new ideas.” Most MPA programs require two years of full-time work, but there are notable exceptions, including Syracuse's program which can be completed in one year.

Why do people study public administration? ›

While studying Public Administration you will develop the leadership and management skills. You will be taught how to manage people efficiently and how to inspire them for the productive work. You will learn how to be a leader and how to transfer tasks to other workers.

Which is better public administration or public policy? ›

If you're drawn to law and statistics, and you are interested in developing public policy, consider an MPP. If you are instead more interested in business, management and related skills, but you'd prefer to work in the public sector rather than private, an MPA might be a better fit.

What's the difference between public affairs and public administration? ›

In short, public affairs is focused on building relationships, public relations focuses on managing reputation, and public administration focuses on implementing laws and policies.

Is public administration the same as public policy? ›

Public policy refers to the process of making organizational decisions and political, management, financial, and administrative policies to meet established goals. Public administration is the study and use of govern- ment policy including both government and non-governmental management.

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